Old Local
Postcards of
Jefferson
County

 

ADAMS

Source: HISTORY OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, NEW YORK -- Franklin B. Hough -- Watertown, New York --- Sterling & Riddell --- 1854

(From Childs’ Gazetteer (Publication of 1890)

ADAMS is situated in the southern part of the county, and is bounded on the north by Hounsfield and Watertown, east by Rodman, south by Lorraine and Ellisburgh, and west by Henderson. It is watered by the north branch of Sandy Creek and many tributary brooks in the south, and by Stony Creek, with numerous small branches, in the northern part. Both streams are fed by springs and afford permanent water-power, which has been utilized. The surface of the town is generally level, except in the northwestern part, which is somewhat broken by the lake ridge which here traverses the town. The territory was originally timbered with maple, beech, birch, elm, and butternut, a considerable area of which yet remains. Cedar and pine also prevailed, and contributed largely to the early wealth of the town. The soil is generally fertile---a black mold, sandy loam, or a loam somewhat mixed with clay, underlaid by limestone, with outcroppings of this rock on high ground. There is very little waste land in the town, a portion of the most elevated being susceptible of cultivation. That which seems most sterile affords excellent grazing.

This town was formed from Mexico, April 1, 1802. It received its name in honor of President John Adams, and included No. 7, or Aleppo, and No. 8, or Orpheus, of the “Eleven Towns,” or the “Black River Tract.” This area was maintained until No. 8 became a separate town, with the name of Rodman, March 24, 1804. (read More...)

Evidence of early Indians:

In Adams there was a large earthwork by the Watertown line, near Appling, which Squier describes as being on the second terrace, with seven gates and an outside ditch. This was 600 feet long and had pits within. The skeletons were found in a sitting position. A smaller enclosure was half a mile from Adams village, and about 500 feet long. It is said to have produced pipes. pottery and beads. A silver star was found here and was probably accidental. Two miles north was another larger than the one near Appling, from which it was 1.5 miles distant. In barber's Historical Collection Of New York, publishd in 1841, the many earthworks are mentioned. The writer also says: "There have been also discovered seven of the tumular remains of moderate height with the ditcj encircling them, an area from a half to two acres each"

1918 Farm Map
1864 Map East Half
1864 Map West Half

 

 

 

NORTH MAIN STREET

BELOW. 1980:

The water tower located on Route 11 stands on Doxtator's Hill

 

Below, 1980

Looking out Prospect Street onto Main Street. Prospect Street used to
be named North Street.

Looking out Prospect Street onto Main Street 1980

BELOW

Looking down North Main Street 1980

BELOW, 1980

G L Thomas is now gone and is a parking lot for the Fire Department. This is where Dell Greenley & Sons Auto Dealers
Was located

Below, 1980

This is opposite the Fire Department on the bottom of North Main Street. Ecology Park was formed in the 1970's
and is just a grassy area with no benches or tables.

Below, 1980

At the top of North Main Street hill was Gables Old Folks home.

 

MAIN STREET

 

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street. It took about an hour to get it really blazing

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

.

BELOW:

Laundromat on Main Street.

The former laundromat building on main Street which was demolished a few weeks ago, housed thriving businesses back at the beginning of the century. This old postcard shows the structure when Scott & Whittier ( Funeral Directors - Furniture and Carpets) and C B Grimshaw were headquartered there. The building which had served as the Adams Village Baptist Curch in the earlier 1800's was moved to the downtown site from East Church Street.

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

 

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

BELOW:

Laundromat on Main Street. This sagging laundromat was C B Grinshaw & Scott & Whittier,
funeral directors. They also dealt in furniture.

The former Jay-Kay Laundromat was sagging and there was much concern for collapse and
cause damage to the adjacent buildings over the North Sandy Creek. The roof had buckled
several feet and the interior walls buckled. The building was owned by John Babitskas.

September 10 1980: The Jefferson County Journal published:

"By late Friday afternoon all that remained of the former Jay-Kay Laundromat Building,
Main Street, Adams, was a pile of rubble. Demolition began Thursday when the storefront gave
way to the jaws of a crane the following day it ended the fears that the collapsing building
would damage adjacent structures. The roof of the building began to settle several weeks ago after
a portion of the foundation crumbled along the creek bed. The Village of Adams accepted the low
bid of Wesley Alcombrack, $5000, for the demolition only a few days earlier. The building, which had
housed the Adams Village Baptist Church in the mid-1800's was moved to the downtown
location when the present church was constructed."

 

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

BELOW:

September 21 1980..Controlled burn of the Laundromat on Main Street

 

Belloff's Store got a facelift...look under that old siding. What does it say???

Belloff's was established by Aaron Belloff in 1914. He was originally a
traveling salesman in a way. A persistent Jewish businessman, who packed his
wares on his back, he eventually used horse and wagons. Mr Belloff was known
for his generosity - every Christmas he gave equal sums to churched even in
nearby towns

Finally!

Below in 1980:

The EAST Side of Main street.
From left to right:

Montgomery Ward
Adams Pastry Shop

 

Below in 1980:

The EAST Side of Main street.

The Cleveland Block housed:

  • Dr Silver, Optometrist
  • Lucy's, a ladies' clothing store
  • Montgomery Wards

The next block housed Adams pastry Shop

The next building housed Gray's Florist

The next building housed Ramblewood Beauty Shop

The last store is the K & M Variety store owned by Mike Stoner of Pierrepont Manor.

There used to be another store after that but it burned in the 1960's. Other businesses that have been on the East side
are: A drugstore; Edwards & Clark (they sold ice cream and sodas); Bob's Auto Parts and many others

 

 

Below in 1980:

The West Side of Main street.
From left to right:

  • Kinneys Drug Store (yellow with orange sign)
  • Marty's Restaurant
  • McIlvenie & Brown Insurance
  • Jeffersion County Journal
  • and finally, the Dwight Block, conatining Ring's Department Store, owner Fred Ring

    In the back part of the building on the West Church side was a Barber Shop run by Jerome Nutting
    and Frank Carpenter

Below in 1980:

The West Side of Main street.
From left to right:

Jefferson County Journal

The Dwight Block, where Rings was located.

The Dwight Block


The Dwight Block was built in 1885 on the corner of Main Street and Railroad Street (now W. Church St.) and has been a prominent building site for 120 years. On July 11, 2005 the site will be torn down due to structural problems from neglect for the last 12 years.

The history of the block follows:
On August 28, 1884 most of the west side of Main Street, in the village of Adams, burned to the ground. This included the Cooper House Block which occupied the corner of Main and Railroad Streets. Businessman DeAlton A. Dwight, the owner of the property, hired master builders, William H. Wheeler and David Gaylord, of Adams, to build a new block on the same site. The Dwight Block was a three stroy brick building, measuring 53'x64' and was completed in October 1885. The first floor has three stores with full plate glass windows and a stairway to the upper floors. The first businesses to occupy the building were: Lucy Bullock's Millinery Shop (1885-1913), which had a corner store. The next store to the south was Sewell Barney's Jewelry Store (1885-1902), followed by E.C. Bersie's Grocery Store. On the second floor was J.W. Penny's Insurance Office in the southwest corner, Clara Andrus' Dressmaking Shop, Dr. R.T. Kirkland's Dental Office was in the northeast corner and there were two apartments. On the third floor was the Photo Studio of Adelaide Johnson.
Other businesses to occupy space in the block over the years had been:
Dwight & Eddy Bookstore (1890-1894)
Dr. Marquis Manville, DDS (1901-1910), followed by Dr. Harry Tyler, DDS (1910-1934)
Dr. Ross A. Clark, DDS (1906-1917)
Dr. Harry L. Richmond, DDS (1918-?1920's)
William E. Wright's Grocery Store (1907-08), followed by Daniel F. Griggs (1908-1910), followed by Percy Thornton (3/1910-10/1910).
The Rock Bottom Grocery Store (1890-1895)
Frank J. Garvin's Grocery Store (1907-1914)
'Babcock & Potter' Grocery Store (1897-1903), continued by Henry Babcock (1903-1912).
A&P Grocery Store (1928-1929)
Frank J. Williams Jewelry Store (1906-1929)
Wiliam Scott Jewelry Store (1930-1935)
Herbert I. Pierce's Dry Goods Store (1894-1911)
Huested Photo Studio (c.1890-1923)
Mark Flansburg's General Store (1924-1938), followed by Ring's Department Store (1938-1986), in 1946 Alan & Fred Ring expanded the store to cover the entire first floor of the block. Ring's Department Store was followed by the Blue Merlin Department Store (1986-1989). This was followed by Fassett's Market (1989-1990).

The building had been vacant ever since 1993. The ravages of time coupled with no repairs on the roof for over a decade, have caused the building to deteriorate to the point that it was structurally unsound and was a hazard to the public. After 120 years the building had to come down.

 

W J Parlow's hardware Store is another business of the past that was on the west side of
Main Street.

Below in 1980:

The West Side of Main street.
From left to right:

  • Gould's
  • Belloffs
  • Sinclair Insurance (red building)
  • Kinney's Drug Store
  • Marty's Restaurant
  • McIlvenie & Brown Insuranc

Below in 1980:

The West Side of Main street.
From left to right:

  • Jay-Kay Laundromat
  • Adams Ale - in the past called Duggan's Bar. At one time Adams Ale was a parking lot which proved to be dangerous
    when a woman accidentally drove off into the creek in her car and was killed
  • Small white building was Cooper's Shoe Store established by George Cooper from England and sold in 1980 to Cal Thompson
  • the last building is Gould's Bar and Grill

 

 

BELOW:

"Mill and Carriage Firm in 1869 - This view of the East Side of Main Street, Adams, in 1869 shows the Red Mill
which was located adjacent to the creek, present site of South Jefferson Rescue Squad facilities, and the G S Dodge
carriage manufacturing firm on the corner of Spring Street.

The mill was believed to have originally been built in 1828 and was operated for many years
by E J Seeber and later was owned by W A Mather. The mill was torn down and a gas station erected
at that site in the early 1900's."

Also, located at one time here:

ADAMS FLOURING MILL

Adams flouring mill was built by Willard Smith, on the site of the old David Smith mill, about 1825. In 1860 it was purchased by George Frasier, and in the spring of 1863 S. H. Pitcher became half owner. In 1879 Mr. Pitcher became sole proprietor. The mill has four runs of stones and grinds 60,000 bushels of grain annually.

 

Just beyond the white building which is the current site of the South Jefferson Rescue Squad is Spring
Street. On the southern side of the corner of Spring Street and Main Street was a drug store.
Also on that same side, only further out Spring Street by a few yards was the site of
School House No 6 on the 1864 map. It is most likely the same site as where the Larkins
Building was in 1980.

 

 

Below in 1980:

Below in 1980:

Cleveland Block which had three businesses: H & R Block, William McCluskey, attorney. The original
Light & Power Company was orginally established March 28 1889 and was located where
William McCluskey's office was

Below:

Main Street Looking North in 1907. A view of the Frasier and Pitcher Building as it looked before the fire. Note corner door, the same
design as it is today only then it was a clapboard structure. Note the Lamson Market in the right foreground. it was here that Mr Rafferty
started up his business again after the fire. The presence of hydrants is surprising at this early date. See excavation at the corner of Grange
and Main. You can be assured that is is not the sewer project,

 

BELOW from the Jefferson County Journal:

Bank before 1920 - The Citizen's National Bank, Adams, is shown as it appeared prior to alterations in 1919 or 1920 in this old photo from the South
Jefferson Historical Association. At that time, the bank occupied one store's width next to the Dwight Block on the West side of Main Street. It was
remodeled to include the adjacent store to the south and during alterations banking continued in the brick building on the Northwest corner of Main Street.
At the start of business each day the money and books were carried by the clerks from the vault across the road to the temporary quarters and back each
night. Marion Steel recalls watching them walk single file -- each with a load of books or cash box -- her father, Rufus W Ripley, at the end of the line
with a pistol in hand to discourage any robbers.

Note: The Citizen's national bank organized August 7 1889 was where the Jefferson County Journal was

1980, below:

looking at Main Street

Ivory & Carter was a store much like Ring's where Ring's was located in 1980 (now a public area)

 

Below in 1980:

Car lot belonging to Kenneth Wade of Wade Buick Pontiac.

This same lot - the corner of Main & Spring on the Creek side was the location of G S Dodge,
carriage manufacturer

 

Below in 1980 there was an ARCO gas Station at the foot of South main Street

There was a hotel there owned by S Goodrich at one time.

BACK TO TOP

 

SOUTH MAIN STREET

 

 

This was 27 S Main St before it burned a couple years ago....was called the old 'Parlow Mansion'

Below 1980

Adams Rural Cemetery at the top of the South Main Street hill

Nicholas Salisbury was the first settler in the town, born April 2 1762 and died December 10 1833
His wife, Roweena Wheelock was born December 20 1760 and died 1802. His second wife,
Caroline Lord was born 1766 and died August 7 1822. He moved to Adams in 1801 and in attempting to
cross the creek in a scow was borne over the dam and drown. This was the first death in town

Buried in Rural Cemetery

EDWARD SALISBURY


A native of Rhode Island moved to Western Oneida County NY in 1793 and to Adams in 1802.
He was the father of twelve children: Nicholaus, Edward, Duty, Enon, Lodowick, Alexander,
De Esting, Smith, Lovina, Sarah, Charlotte and Abigail. Was 1st Lieutenant in the French and Indian War and served
1755-1758. Was in several battles at Ticonderoga where 2,000 men fell. His brother was killed at his side and he
had nine balls shot in his coat. He was in the battle on the plains of Abraham where Wolf fell. Served in the
Revolutuionary War and died march 1829 age 104 years

Revolutionary War Veterans buried in the Village of Adams
Rural Cemetery, Adams -
Abiel Carpenter (6/20/1750 - 1840)
John Carpenter (2/2/1739 - 1/12/1805)
Peter Doxtater (12/25/1750 - 12/1/1842)
John Mandeville (10/11/1753 - 4/17/1827)
John Merriman (1/17/1756 - 12/14/1843)
Jabez Moore (dates unk.)
Ammiel Penny (7/18/1743-2/16/1816)
Preserved Redway (7/14/1764 - 4/25/1837)
Edward Salisbury (9/6/1733 - 3/29/1829)
Jacob Weaver (3/7/1760 - 3/9/1852)
Carmi Wright (1853 - 7/3/1833)
Moses Wright (1750 - 7/5/1830)
Westwood Wright (4/20/1757 - 4/9/1826)

 

 

ADAMS ASSEMBLY OF GOD in 1981, GETTING A NEW STEEPLE:

1980, the Pastor was Jack Isbister

1980 Below:

Don Rounds American Legion Post.

1980, Below:

Former home and gun shop of W D Dixon. He later had his shop on Grange Avenue where he operated out of the building
that now has Frazer Brothers written on it. This is located at the corner of South Main and Grove Sts

Below in 1980

To the right, about where the cars are parked was a big building last used as
apartments which burned.

There was a big building just this side of the building with the sagging roof
which was the Jay-Kay Laundromat. That is where G B Hardware, a beauty shop
and a liquor store (owned y Donad Edgar) were. In the 1970's the liquor store caught
fire and all the businesses were engulfed in flames.

Across the street is the South Jeff Rescue Squad where in the past stood a saw mill, and a
grist mill which obtained power from a dam which crossed the creek near the downtown bridge.
The dam gave way in the 1930's. Later the site had on it a gas station.

This view is from the lawn belonging to the old Dixon home at the top of the hill at the
corner of Grove and South main.

 

 

 

1980, Below was a Catholic Church but then turned into an apartment house.

 

BACK TO TOP

 

 

EAST CHURCH STREET

Looking down East Church Street in 1981 when Rod's Big M was there and before
they torn down the house next to it for a parking lot

 

 

We lived at 37 East Church Street at the time the Annex caught fire.
The brick building was unharmed and no one hurt

Below in 1980:

Robbins Farm Supply moved here from Adams Center.
It was Gleason's IGA and also the Grand Union

Below 1980:

Looking up East Church Street at what is now the Mason Haal. It was the Presbyterian church, the oldest in town organized in 1803.
Charles G Finney preached in this church afterwards becomng an evangelist. The original site of the Presbyterian church was where
the Methodist church is. The Presbyterians built their new church across the street in 1827 where it still stands even after having been
struck by lightning during a service in 1828.

 

Below 1980:

looking out East Church St...the picture includes the Methodist Church, the Sho'N'Go Plaza which houses the Jreck Sub Shop, Mercer's
Shop'N'Go and the Watertiwn Savings Bank.

The Methodist Church is pastored by Reverend Roland Perkins. The church was organized in 1827 and their first place of worship was
bought from the Presbyterians which later burned and in 1852 a new one was built on the same site.

Below in 1980, 37 East Church Street - we lived on the lower half at one time.

"A select school was taught in the old bank building by M C Manning" -
a quote from an old history book of Adams. This was a school for females, the Adams
Seminary, taught by Miss Williams of Troy.

Built in 1816 and opened June 20 1817 for use as the Jefferson County Bank until 1824
which was later moved to Watertown. It was used as a school for a while and the converted to a residence.

Later it was occupied by Presbyterian Society for a session room or chapel.

Among other owners were P C Maxon in 1864, The Doxtaters, Otis Edgar in 1959 and then in
1980 Bruce Thomas and O'Connells.

Behind this building and to the left is a single foundation

 

 

Below 1980

Baptist church, Pastor Peter Bolster, was organized in 1805. First Adams site was
built in 1838 after moving here from the Adams Center area.

 

Below in 1980

This post office was built in the 1960's and prior to that it was a lovely home owned by the Stell Family.
The house and the barn were torn down and burnt to make space. Prior to being here, the Post Office
was located downtown in what was later occupied by Lucy's, a ladies' clothing store in the left side only.
The post office was established in Adams in 1806

 

 

Below:


November 1980, the Burning of the Methodist Parsonage, last inhabited by
Charles Stewart and family, was located at 38 East Church Street and was
the location on the parsonage for over 100 years. In 1885, a new parsonage
was built here


Below:
November 1980, the Burning of the Methodist Parsonage

Below:
November 1980, the Burning of the Methodist Parsonage

Below:
November 1980, the Burning of the Methodist Parsonage

Below:
November 1980, the Burning of the Methodist Parsonage

Below in 1980:

looking down East Church street from the intersection. From buildings right to left are:

Dr Kirk Williams, dentist
Shear Delight (pinkish facade) hair dresser
An apartment building
A barber shop operated by Gary Sweet
Florist Shop operated by Cal Thompson
and the CAPC - Outreach Center

 

Below in 1980:

Looking up East Chruch Street from the intersection
The first building is the Bundy Block which burned in 1918 The bottom floor is the CAPC and the upper
floor is supposed to be where meetings are held for ACT II a newly formed organization to revitalize Adams.

Also in the past, other stores that occupied this area were:

Surprise Store (clothing)
A candy Store - see the article
a gas station and more...

South Jefferson revisited, pubished in 1980, by Joe Valley:

THE DAY THE CANDY STORE BURNED

It was a cold, blustery night and the chief of police, Henderson Blair, was making his rounds
to be sure that the Village of Adams was safely tucked in. Saturday night, usually a night of
street activity, had been quiet this night. A lot of 'the boys' had been sent overseas to fight the
great war, and the older folks had long ago retired for the night.

The nineteenth amendment was being voted on by the various states, heading for ratification,
but was not yet final. The Chief knew that if and when it was put into law, there would be many
a quiet Saturday night along Main street. He also knew that the enforcement of the prohibition
law would add to his problems too.

It was about 1:45 AM on Sunday, March 3rd that the Chirf first smeeled smoke. the year was 1918.
The smoke smelled of grease and wood and paper and he followed his nose to its source. It was coming
from the northeast corner of the Frasier and Pitcher Block on the corner of Main and Church Street.
The location of the smoke was in the rear of the F M Williams Restaurant. On closer inspection, the
Chief could see the flicker of the flames on the resataurant kitchen ceiling and the Chief hastily sounded
the alarm. the firemen arrived quickly, rubbing the sleep from their eyes and soon had several streams of
water playing on he clapboard building, but the entire building seemed to be filled with smoke that soon
burst into a mass of flames. The flames moved quickly to the adjacent Ackerman Block on Church Street.

The upper floor of the Frasier and Pitcher Building held the dental office of Dr R T Kirkland, but the big
worry was the residents of the two housekeeping apartments on that floor. Mr and Mrs Carl Jimerson
occupied one of these apartments. They had been aroused by the shouting and activity on the street
and they barely escaped with their lives. Mrs Jimerson attempted to gather some of their personal
property but was forced to jump from the window to the waiting firemen. All of their personal papers,
furniture, and memorabilia were devoured by the flames. They had no insurance.

Mr and Mrs Charles Cushamn were the other tenants on the second floor and the last to be aroused.
Charlie lowered his wife out the window, but had to let go because of the intense heat and she fell,
spraining her wrist and ankle very severely. Mrs Cushman also suffered from nervous shock that would
take many months to overcome. Charlie Cushamn also jumped from the second floor window after trying
to locate the little family dog. The dog apparently panciked and hidden somewhere in the apartment.
The dog was to become the only fatality of the fire.

People were gathering in the streets on this early, cold March morning. Some came to give aid to the
firemen, some of the ladies brought coffee and snacks for the firefighters, and some people came just
to watch. The boys from the high school were very helpful in fighting this blaze.

The firemen soon called for their steamer which was stationed over on Railroad Street (now West Church St).
The steamer had five lines, the full capacity soon playing on this firewhich by now had gotten out of hand.
Their job now was to try to confine it to just the Frasier and Pitcher Block and the Ackerman Block as it
had already spread to that structrure. The clapboard building and the brisk winds contributed to the
fierceness of the flames.

There were other families on the second floor of the Ackerman Block which was owned by C R Ackerman
of Brier Hill. They had ample warning to get out of their apartments before the fire reached them but their
furniture and property were a complete loss. The families that shared the second floor of this building were:
Dan Hess and his family; Abner Hess and his family and well as Mrs Mamie Giddings and her son Johnny and
daughter Fanny. This was no new experience for the Giddings family. It was the third time they had been
burned out, and the second time within five years. The families in the fire would all be taken care of by
relatives until they could find other housekeeping facilities.

The business establishments in the dwntown portion of the building suffered the greatest monetery loss.
The WOmen's Specialty Shop was already in flames by the time the steamer arrived. This shop was owned by
Miss Henrietta Stillman abd had a larger-than-normal stock of apparel because of a large shipment that had
arrived on Saturday, less than 24 hours before the fire. Miss Myrtle Moore, who is associated with Henrietta
in the shop had also received a shipment of fine millinery already marked and ready to be moved to a nearby
vacant store for storage. Miss Stillman's loss of $4,500 was hardly compensated for by a $2,500 insurance
policy. Miss Moore's hats had coverage for only a small portion of their value. Both of these ladies had
discussed incrasing their insurance during the past week.

The Adams Candy Kitchen was another business in the Ackerman Building that felt the full fury of the flames
that were whipped by the cruel March winds. The 'Kitchen' was owned by Thomas Zondiros and was the next to go.
The abundant supply of sugar stored on the premises only added heat to the flames. Firemen would later comment
that this was indeed the hottest part of the conflagration.

Next door to the Candy Kitchen was the office of the American Express Company. Mr F C Dexter, resident manager,
was able to move out all the heavy stock and valuable papers.

Mr M L Rafferty's meat market, with a large supply of meat products receieved the same treatment, although the
water appeared to do more damage than the flames. Mr Rafferty was able with the help of friends, save nearly all
of his meats for later sale at the old Lamson market. All of his helpers were not friends however, and some of the
meat ended up in personal refrigerators around town. This pilferage was only a small portion of his total supply
and what have might been burned on the fire

Mr Murray, manager of the Ford showroom managed to get the two Ford cars out of the building, besides some
supplies and fixtures. They had some warning time to do this and the would continue in business

The plumbing business of John Groff was in the store at the end of the line of buildings that comprised the
Ackerman Block. He was lucky in removing a large portion of his goods.

The President of the Village M F C Overton, phoned to Watertown for additional equipment to fight the blaze. he could
envision the whole of downtown Adams being destryed in the destructive holocaust. The Watertown department
responded quickly and loaded their equipment on a special train for delivery to Adams. A message met them at the
junction sayingthat the fire was under control at last. The firefighters and the citizens had fought this fire for five hours,
dawn had arrived and the people gradually returned to their homes to get much needed rest.

many of the children who came to watch the fire had attempted from time to time to get at the candy in the Candy Kitchen.
Some succeeded but risked personal injury doing it. Others were turned back by a good stroke across their seats by the
firemen and spectators.

What has started out as a routine night for Chief Henderson Blair had turned into a night to remember not only for him
and the firemen, but the families and business people who had suffered irreplaceable losses.

Today is August 13th in the year 1980, a long 21,796 days since that fateful morning but life goes on. A few of the older
cictizens still remember that night but to most it's a childhood memory but it is remembered.

The Bundy Block replaced the Frasier and Pitcher Block in 1921. It is now home of the local Community Action Planning
Council. it is here where some of the senior citizens meet each weekday noon for a good nutritious meal. It is here that many
community programs of this fine organization are launched and activated by their many community-minded volunteers.
In one portion of the upstairs of this building is the operations and meeting room for ACT II, a volumteer organization of
citizens who are doing all they can to beautify and stimulate the downtown section of the Village. The Craft Shop of the CAPC
occupies the eastern half of this building to give persons with craft abilities an opportunity to show and sell their skills.

The CAPC is in the process of making the upstairs portion of the building into a series of community rooms for meetngs, for
craft classes, for the showing of movies and all the many activities that are generated by an avtive community. They also
plan to have a used clothing store so that the disadvantaged may get adequate clothing for themselves and their children.
They need volunteers to help with the renovation, to help with the clothing, to do the many tasks of this many faceted
organization. Any hours you can give to them will be appreciated by them as well as your community.

The Ackerman Block has more or less been replaced with a series of individual buildings. Next to the Bundy Block, going east,
in Andy Thompson's Florist Shop, the Gary Sweet's Barber Shop with living quarters upstairs. Next is a downstairs apartment
occupies by Mr Jon Whitford with the upstairs apartment resided in by Mrs Alma Denny. Next is a downstairs beauty salon called
Shear Delight with an apartment upstairs occupied by Mrs Ruth Clark and her son Charles. Charles is the Village Historian
of Adams. This four unit building is owned by Mrs Nellie Holman.

The next building houses the dental offices of Dr Kirk A Williams and the end building is occupied by Terry 's Beauty Salon
operated by Debbie Abbott. Upstairs is the apratment occupied by Harold Corey who had been burned out of his apartment on
the corner of Liberty and South Main only a few years ago.

Future historians take note. This is the way is was on the 13th day of August 1980 and that is how it was on that cold and blustery
March night in 1918. I thought you'd like to know.'

 

 


Below:

1980 This house was once the Public Reading and Lecture Hall. It was
moved to that location and later a second story was added. It is on the 1864 Map

Below in 1980:

This building was erected in 1865 and was the Hungerford Bank (1844-1881), also the
Adams National Bank (1883-1889), the Farmer's National Bank, and then changed into a
residence. In 1973 the South Jefferson Historical Society was there.

Sitting out front was Harold Cory, longtime native of Adams.

The last people to reside here were Mr & Mrs Edward Smith

 

 

Below in 1980 the Marine Midland Bank

 

 

Below: Lisk Bridge 1980

Below: Lisk Bridge 1980

BACK TO TOP

 

 

WEST CHURCH STREET

1864:

1888:

1980, below:

looking out West Church Street towards Belleville.

The right side of the Dwight Block (Rings)
The Adams Hotel

 

1980, below:

looking out West Church Street towards Belleville. On the right is the old Freeway store and just beyond the store
is Littlefield's home where he sold flowers and lawn ornaments.

There is a short street called Park Row which goes directly parallel with the Agway sign. About 150 feet down further is
another short street called Elmwood Avenue. At its end is the entrance to Elmwood Cemetery.

Below 1980:

looking out West Church street and out still further is a Mobil gas station owner by Mr Berry. Out behind there are the
foundations of the old Webster Canning Factory which burnt. The canning factory was established July 1889 and specialized in
canning dandelions and spinach.(Note: 2017 this is where Dunkin Donuts and the Liquor Store are now).

.

Below in 1980:

Old Building used by Belloff's department Store for storage

1980, below:

looking out West Church Street towards Belleville.
The red building on the left, the Dwight Block, is where the Cooper House Block once stood and
originally extended back further including where the Adams Hotel is. It was this part that burned when the
Adams Collegiate Institute occupied it.

1980, below:

looking out West Church Street towards Belleville. The Hotel Adams orgiginally operated under the name Continental
during the early 1900's. When James B Worthen was proprietor in 1090, the Hotel boasted modern,
refurnished accommodations at rates of only $2 per day. The Hotel is beieved to have been constructed in 1893 or 1894

 

 

looking out West Church Street towards Belleville and Main Street

On the corner of Main and West Church Street once stood the Cooper House Block later replaced with the
Dwight Block and now is a grassy public park.

The Cooper House Block is shown BELOW as it appeared prior to the disastrous fire in August 1884
The large structure, which at one time housed classes for the Adams Collegiate Institute encompassed the
site of the present Dwight Block and the Hotel Adams

 

Below:

The Hotel Adams

From article in the Journal:

Many articles which daqted back nearly a century - possibly even more - sold at an auction Saturday at Hotel Adams.
The auction was conducted by Hobart and Robert Hutchinson and was held to settle the estate of the late Martin and
Virginia Sullivan who had operated the Adams landmark for more than 20 years.

Restaurant and bar equipment was not sold, since the hotel will remain open and efforts are currently underway to
find a buyer for the property

The present Hotel Adams Building is believed to have been built in 1893 or 1894 approximately a decade after a
disastrous fire destroyed much of the West side of Main Streetand the block which extended from Main Street
over the site of the present Hotel.

Early records show that William Doxtater had owned a large parcel of property along main and West Church Streets
in 1837. It was later deeded to Solon D Hungerford in 1861. General Hungerford, a prominent citizen and banker in Adams,
and founder of Hungerford Collegiate Institute, sold the property to Thomas P Saunders in 1864. A portion of the
property apparently was sold to George Cooper in 1868 and some time after that the large brick building which housed
the Cooper House was constructed. The Cooper House was situated on the site if the Dwight Block where Ring's
Variety Store was was and extended along West Church Street also encompassing the adjacent Hotel property.
In addition to housing several shops and stores, the Adams Collegiate Institute also was housed in the massive building
for two yeard from 1882 -1884. The disastrous fire on Thursday August 28 1884 not only sent the Institute looking for
another home but also burned 10 other buildings whci housed a total of 30 businesses. Ironically the $104,795 fire sparked
interest in better fire-fighting equipment and since that time devastating fires have been less common int the vilage.

In the 1870's and 1880's portions of the property passed through approximately ten different owners but records
show that Catherine X Dwight sold property to Herbert and Henry Pierce in 1894. Approximately the same time that the
Hotel was constructed. Henry Pierce sold the property to Edward J Wait in December 1899 and Roberta Raymond
apparenty took possession of the hotel in 1907

It is not known what the name of the name of the hotel was when it was first opened but in 1909 James B Worthen
was the proprietor under the name of Continental Hotel.

In a 'Souvenir of Adams' booklet, which was published by the Fire Department in 1909, the Continental was touted
as the recently refurbished and refitted to provide first class accommodations for only $2 per day. At that time they
were in competition with the Hotel Gardner, a large brick hotel across the street which was later razed to make
room for the Adams Municiple Building,

During the next decade the hotel changed ownership approximately five times with the longest period of ownership
being Fred and Sarah Smith nearly five years

Clarence and Pearl Hitton owned the hotel from 1922 to 1926 and it was sold to Charles and Bernadette Ziegler
in 1927; proprietors may have encountered financial difficulty during the Depression years when it was
deeded to bank ownership

The past two owners, however, have operated the hotel for a nearly 40 year span. The Hotel was purchased by
James A Ireland in April 1941 and operated by him until it was sold to Mr and Mrs Sullivan in January 1958

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The old Hotel clock is now on display at the South Jefferson Historical Society.

The tags were used to show whicvh rooms were occupied

 

 

Below

Hotel Adams in 1966

 

Below 1980:

The Adams Agway located just off West Church Street ,once called Railroad Street, and was once the R P White Malt House. R P White sold
his malt house in 1876 to W A and E J White who established their own Malting businesses.

The Agway was once level with the railroad tracks - now an underpass exists - and this explained the existence of the use of the front (which in 1980) became the side
door. Phelps Street, now a dead-end, at one thime crossed these tracks.

 

Below 1980:

The Adams Agway

Below 1980:

The Adams Agway

BELOW 1980,

View of the Agway as seen from the Railroad Depot which burned

 

1980, Below:

Looking out West Church Street..Clay Street turns off West Church St on the right and connects with both Phelps and High Sts

.

Below in 1980

Freeway Store on the right.

 

.

Below in 1980

Antique store house that is rented by Mrs Ellie Illingsworth

Below 1980

Snyder's Guest Home

At that time it was for sale like many buildings in Adams.

 

Below 1980

An old foundation of the Northern Evaporated Milk Company, which in 1980 belonged to Gordon Dobbins who ran a used car
lot on Route 11 on North Main Street. Wells Benton farm was located at the Dobbins car lot. Wells Benton was a sheriff at one time
and one of the first trustees of the village.

July 20 1966:
Opened for business on November 1 1927, the Borden Milk Plant in Adams will close July 31 and all operations of the local plant
will be transferred to Watertown

 

.

Below in 1980:

Municiple Building. Small grassy area with a couple of monument stones and benches. Behind this area is the Firemen's Park
where Field Days and fairground activities are held. Used to have nice fireworks every July 4th.

 

Below in 1980

The Municipal Building which houses the Library, Police and Fire and the clerk. This site was once the Whitney Hotel in the mid 1860's
with W H Whitney, Proprietor. It is on the corners on Main and West Church Streets.

This is also where the Masonic Opera House was located. On the second floor movies were shown.
This town was visited by John Philip Sousa.
The site where the Municiple Building is was where the National Hotel was. It was a three-story brick building around 1915.

BACK TO TOP

 

FIFTH AVENUE

Off to the left down West Church Street is a very short road called Fifteh Avenue which is how one would enter into
these old foundations.

Below, 1980

C N Snyder and Sons and behind it is the old Webster Sash and Lumber Compnay which a[[ears on the 1864 map as
Holman and Withington Machine and Foundry Shops.

 

BELOW, taken 1980

C N Snyder and Son buildings. This was once the F L Webster Lumber Mill.

Below, 1980:

The back view of C N Snyder as seen from Liberty Street

 

 

 

GRANGE AVENUE (once called River St)

 

Grange Avenue begins at Main Street on the north side corner of the creek. There was a
building at this corner called the Cook Building which had fallen into the creek. Now is a little
public park area.

In the Cook Building, Daniel Lamson, born 1836, of Lorraine had a boot and shoe store and later
Lamson's Meat Market. I also remember a Billiards Hall and a clothes store being there. There are still steps
visible that walk down where the entrance used to be

1864

1888


Below, 1980

House once owned by Adelia Button being torn down by Ray R Dockstader

.

 

Below 1980:

 

Owned by Gordon Dobbins in 1980, was once a factory which manufactured salve and liniments. It was made by H O Kenyon and marketed
under the name of Dr Hale's Liniment. It was located on Grange Avenue, once called River Street. Later is was used as an auction barn

 

Below 1980:

Dr Austin K Hale, born 1850, son of Dr Austin P Hale, from Massachusetts, sold his salves and made them here. He aso was a
trustee of the Adams Furniture and Manufacturing Company established 1888. D A Dwight was the president. The building from
which they operated were two 50x100 feet and three stories and 50x100 feet, two stories.

Below 1980:

 

This building, was Ken's Auto Body. It was bought by the South Jefferson Historical Society. They were removing the siding which revealed these words underneath.
This is also the site where Will Dixon had his gun shop.

BACK TO TOP

 

 

Railroad Street

BELOW, 1980

The old Brick Hotel which has since burned. It was around this same aea that the
Hungerford Collegiate Institute was originally located.

BELOW 1980:

Where the present house and garage are was once the Adams Collegiate Institute and then changed to the Hungerford Collegiate Institute.
Across the tracks and the the right was once the Jefferson Spring. The Institute was built first as a hotel in the hopes that it would attract business but it never opened

To the LEFT of the brick Hotel, the last site on the left is where Captain Sidney Mendell, in 1859,
began construction of a three-story wooden building by the depot, called the Basswood Hotel.
There is a mineral springs in this area - where Dairylea was located in 1980 - and these springs
brought in people. But for lack of finances, he sold it to Solon D Hungerford who finished it and used it
for the Hungerford Collegiate Institute which opened Spegtember 8 1864. It was originally incorporated
under the Adams Collegiate Institute by the Regents April 22 1855, but not fully organized. S D Hungerford
changed the name to Hungerford Collegiate Institiute March 24 1864. The building burned January 29 1868
and a new one built on Institute Streetand opened August 28 1870. During the time when this new building
was not in use due to its being in debt, school was held in the Cooper Block which in 1980 , was the Dwight Block,
until it too burned. After that, the building on Institute Street was re-acquired and put back into use

 

The Railroad Depot in Adams on Railroad Street -
up behind the old Brick Hotel. around 1980

1980:

The railroad depot, now abandoned, was once the center of people coming and going. You could observe the old road leading to it.

Several foundations can be found in this area.

Below, 1980

 

.

Below, 1980

Several foundations can be found in this area

Below, 1980:

probably at one time this building was a livery of sorts..it is seen from the tracks

 

Below 1980

Probably an original part of the Rosemary Creamery which eventually
became Dairylea, and now Great Lakes Cheese.

 

BACK TO TOP

 

LIBERTY STREET

 

Adams at one time had an Engine and Hose Company and
Hook and Ladder. The Tempest Fire Company was established 1853 with 44 men

It had a wooden five story bell tower to the left of the station and it also housed the
village jail.

Below in 1980 Village of Adams Water Pollution Control Plant

Below in 1980...looking out Liberty St

 

 

BUILDING WITH IRON BARS ON WINDOWS...

Below in 1980

An odd looking vacant House...the floor was a dirt floor

Along Liberty Street bank was a cheese factory established 1864 by Huestis, Lewis and Ingraham.

BELOW:

The Roy Green house, now (in 1980) used by K-B Motors (now gone) on Liberty Street was at one time
E D Spicer's candle and soap factory which showed on the 1864 map.
Also at this site once stood the A V Bettinger Carriage Manufactory

in 1980: the brick building was owned and occupied by Orville Fink and the small white house at the very
back was inhabited by Fannie Livermore. At one time it was a photography studio.

Below her house is the "Green" house.

 

BACK TO TOP

 

 

 

SPRING STREET

Below in 1980

House owned by Larkins. The site of an old school house, No 6, possibly the old Fox School

BELOW 1980

Along Spring Street bank about where the Niagara Mohawk sublet is (in 1980) was a Brewery and Malt House owned by Kellogg & Patrick.

\

BELOW:

1980, Old house owned by Ken Reardon

BACK TO TOP

 

 

NORTH PARK STREET

BELOW:

1980

BELOW:

1980, looking down South Park St from E Church St. The brick building is the Baptist parsonage which was occupied (in 1980)
by Reverend Peter Bolster and family. The white building with the big white columns is Piddock's Funeral Parlor at that time.

\

 

BELOW

1980

Outer Park Street near Doxtator Street. Bedor Farms

BELOW

1980

Outer Park Street near Doxtator Street. Bedor Farms

BACK TO TOP

 

 

 

SOUTH PARK STREET (once called Factory St)

Below 1980

Once a Free Methodist Church on the corner of Spring and South Park Sts.

All Along Sandy Creek area were many old mostly abandoned factories. The Roy Green house, now (in 1980) used by K-B Motors (now gone) on Liberty Street
was at one time E D Spicer's candle and soap factory.

About where O D Greene's was in 1980, was a woolen factory established by Julius Fox; 1860 sold to various owners over the years, for example
W R Willis Jr, and then in 1884 to WIlliam Wheeler; 1889 to W H Proctor of Ogdensburg who formed the Adams Lumber Company. There was a planing mill
and a blind and sash mill established in 1860 by W C Wheeler.

Opposite the bank where Grange Avenue now runs was a tannery owned by the Weavers.

Along Liberty Street bank was a cheese factory established 1864 by Huestis, Lewis and Ingraham.

About opposite the creek was Holman & Withington Foundry and Machine Shop.

Along Spring Street bank about wher ethe Niagara Mohawk sublet is (in 1980) was a Brewery and Malt House owned by Kellogg & Patrick.

 

ADAMS LUMBER COMPANY


Mills were established by Julius Fox about 1860 for dressing lumber and manufacturing doors, blinds, moldings, and builders’ supplies. In 1864 the works were purchased by William H. Wheeler, who subsequently (in 1865 or 1866) bought the old woolen factory by the bridge and converted the building into an addition to his works. M

r. Wheeler continued the business until April, 1889, when it was purchased by W. H. Proctor, of Ogdensburg, who immediately formed the Adams Lumber Company, with W. H. Proctor, J. G. Idler, Thomas F. Strong, and George L. Ryan, of Ogdensburg, and J. A. Cameron and W. L. Pratt, of Adams, as partners.

The company manufactures and deals at wholesale and retail in lumber, and as contractors are prepared to erect buildings of any kind. The works are located on Factory street - now South Park Street - Adams village.

O D Greene was originally in Adams Center

 

 

BACK TO TOP

 

 

GROVE STREET

 

Grove Street was the main road instead of South Main Street. It was a forerunner of Route 11. On it was located the Maple Grove Place
and Stock Farm on which R P White raised celebrated horses

 

"MAPLE GROVE PLACE AND STOCK FARM


Maple Grove Place and Stock Farm, located in the southerly part of Adams village, on Grove street, was established by the present proprietor, R. P. White, in 1859. Among the most celebrated horses raised and owned by him the following are particularly worthy of mention: “Capt. Emons,” with a record of 2.19-1/4, sold for $5,500; “Wizz,” 2:23-1/4; “Buzz,” 2:28; “Rufus,” 2:29; “Venus,” 2:31, who sold for $3,500; four mares—”Floss,” “Silk,” “Satin,” and “Velvet,” three of whom were valued at more than $6,000. “Whitewood,” raised by Mr. White, when less than three years old trotted a mile in 2:24. Mr. White is one of the most noted horsemen in the state."

Below 1980

St Cecelia 's Church. The Well Baby Clinics used to be held here.

Below 1980...the nuns live here for St Cecelia's church

.

BACK TO TOP

 

 

INSTITUTE STREET

1864

1888

Below 1980

The old Adams High School, in 1980 was used for elementary grades. Originally the building was erected and opened August 28 1870
and accommodated 60 boarders and 200 day pupils and was college level. In 1882, it was sold for debts abnd the ld name Adams
Collegiate Institute was restored and school then held in the Cooper Block - owned by the Dwights. It burned out, the Dwights applied the
insurance money to the indebted building and in 1884, was again the Hungerford Collegiate Institute, with Orlo B Rhodes, President.

 

 

 

BACK TO TOP

 

WARDWELL STREET

Below 1980

Looking out Wardwell St at the W Rice Building.

Dr Rice of Smithville, and his father-in-law W A Collins, once manufactured "Rupture Cure." The building was originally a grade school
and was bought by Rice. It burned and was rebuilt in 1920. Lallies, a producer of thermal materials, also operated from this building

Just past Rice's to the right is a short street called Bond Streetwhich connects Wardwell street to North Park Street. Also, just after
the bowling alley to the left is Institute Street which connects Wardwell Street with North Main Street.

Below 1980

looking down Wardwell St at what was the Adams Bowling Club.
It was originally a warehouse owned by W Rice

BACK TO TOP

 

 

PHELPS STREET

Below 1980,

Photo of Dairylea at 23 Phelps St

.

Below 1980

Greenley Fuel Company.

Below 1980

Looking down the western half of Phelps Strret. The VFW post is located here

BACK TO TOP

 

ELMWOOD AVENUE

Below 1980

Originally Elmwood Avenure was shaded by rows of elms set by Mr Cleveland who was the organizer of this cemetery in 1867.
James A Cleveland's monument was set at the center of the cemetery. He had his relatives which were buried in New England brought
here to be reburied. Some as far back as 1722 are now in Elmwood. It s noted for its beauty: flowing hills, a brook, trees, a small wooden
bridge and is one of the most beautifully designed cemeteries in the area.

 

Revolutionary War Veterans buried in the Village of Adams:

Jonathan Lamson (2/20/1755 - 12/6/1807)
Alpheus Dwight (4/7/1870 - 9/7/1845)

 

BACK TO TOP

 

 

HUNGERFORD AVENUE

1980 view looking out Hungerford Ave toward North Park St. The street was named in
honor of General Solon D Hungerford

BACK TO TOP

 

 

HIGH STREET

BACK TO TOP

 

 

SANDY CREEK VIEWS

All Along Sandy Creek area were many old mostly abandoned factories. The Roy Green house, now (in 1980) used by K-B Motors (now gone) on Liberty Street
was at one time E D Spicer's candle and soap factory.

About where O D Greene's was in 1980, was a woolen factory established by Julius Fox; 1860 sold to various owners over the years, for example
W R Willis Jr, and then in 1884 to WIlliam Wheeler; 1889 to W H Proctor of Ogdensburg who formed the Adams Lumber Company. There was a planing mill
and a blind and sash mill established in 1860 by W C Wheeler.

Opposite the bank where Grange Avenue now runs was a tannery owned by the Weavers.

Along Liberty Street bank was a cheese factory established 1864 by Huestis, Lewis and Ingraham.

About opposite the creek was Holman & Withington Foundry and Machine Shop.

Along Spring Street bank about where the Niagara Mohawk sublet is (in 1980) was a Brewery and Malt House owned by Kellogg & Patrick.

There were many little walls and dams and evidences of factories all along the creek.
Unfortunately the water smelled badly from pollutions of every kind.

Below: An old view of Creek in Adams -

This old photo looking west along the North Branch of Sandy Creek from Main Street bridge in
Adams shows a different view than would be seen today. The building on the left was an early candle factory and later was Roy Greene's home.
Dr Nicholson's barn is viewed at the right and farther west the railroad trestles span the creek. Very few houses had been built along
Liberty Street at that time.

BELOW, 1980:

Showing is the hinder part of C N Snyder & Son. It was at one time F L Webster Lumber mill.

BELOW, 1980:

Further down Streeam was a cannery which burned. It was to the rear of the then present-day (in 1980) Berry's Mobile Station.

BELOW:
1980 Looking East on Park Street Bridge

 

BELOW:

The view is taken from the downtown bridge looking toward the east. Notice a second dam which powered the saw mill and grist

mills on the right. It also took the life of Nicholas Salisbury, Dec 10 1833, the town's first settler/

 

.

 

BACK TO TOP

 

 

 

 

OUTER ADAMS AREAS

 

ADAMS CENTER

 

 

O. DE GRASSE GREENE’S SASH, DOOR, AND BLIND MANUFACTORY

O. De Grasse Greene’s sash, door, and blind manufactory is located at Adams Center, and is run by water-power furnished by springs situated within 100 rods of his mills, which give an adequate and unfailing power. Mr. Greene manufactures doors, sash, blinds, and house builders’ materials, and does all kinds of custom planing and matching, furnishing employment to from two to 20 men.

 

The Giddings Bridge is located on a small road that goes off to the right side of
Route 11 headng south just before what used to be the Valley Filling Station

 

Old Patrick House in the Town of Adams (Patrick Road)

 

 

 

MOONEY GULF

 

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